Recent Developments in Bankruptcy Law

“Just enough” is an undeniable—if informal—legal precept.  The concept finds its way into canon from adequacy of pleading to application of equity.  See, e.g., K-Tech Telecommunications, Inc. v. Time Warner Cable, Inc., 714 F.3d 1277, 1284 (Fed. Cir. 2013) (A complaint “must give just enough factual detail to provide ‘fair notice of what

In a recent post, our own Harriet Wallace observed a truism in a recent ruling by the United States Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware in the chapter 7 iteration of the infamous Jevic case—the wording of an order matters.  The Court saw fit to bold and underline that maxim in yet another

The Snowball effect, the Domino effect, and even the Streisand effect all demonstrate the accretive impact of small changes.  Though without a catchy metaphor, the tendency of Circuit splits to attract new and deviating opinions fits the concept—particularly as applied to the deepening rift between Circuits over the constitutionality of United States Trustee fee increases

By Michael L. Temin and Martha B. Chovanes

To give a reorganized debtor a “fresh start,” the Bankruptcy Code provides that the confirmation of a plan discharges the debtor from any debt that arose before the confirmation date.  However, if a potential claimant lacks sufficient notice of a bankruptcy proceeding, due process considerations dictate that

The In re Jevic Holding Corp. chapter 11 case continues to make news.  The case is likely best remembered for the 2017 Supreme Court decision holding that the distribution scheme in a structured dismissal of a Chapter 11 case cannot violate the absolute priority rule.  The case has since been converted to Chapter 7, and

Fox Rothschild Washington D.C. associate, Diana Lyn Curtis McGraw, published an article in TMA’s Journal of Corporate Renewal (April 2021) entitled “The Role of the Trustee in Chapter V Cases.  This article outlines some of the most important duties of a Subchapter V trustee and the trustee’s ability to retain counsel and other restructuring professionals.

The “COVID-19 Bankruptcy Relief Extension Act of 2021” was signed into law by President Biden on March 27, 2021, extending the key provisions of the COVID-19 Bankruptcy Relief Act which was enacted in the CARES Act for another year.

Section 1113 of the CARES Act, which temporarily amended bankruptcy law to assist individuals and businesses

Interplay Between Subordination Agreements and Chapter 11 Cramdown Plans

The Bankruptcy Code provides that subordination agreements are enforceable in bankruptcy to the same extent that such agreements are enforceable under non-bankruptcy law.  11 U.S.C. § 510(a).  However, Section 1129(b)(1) of the Bankruptcy Code permits a Chapter 11 plan to be confirmed subject to certain requirements