Today, President Biden signed into law the Bankruptcy Threshold Adjustment and Technical Corrections Act, S. 3823, 117th Cong. (the “Act”), which, among other things, continues the temporary expansion of subchapter V eligibility.  Section 1182(i)(B)(1) of the Bankruptcy Code originally limited the term “debtor,” for subchapter V purposes, to a person engaged in commercial or business

On March 14, 2022, Senator Chuck Grassley (R-IA) introduced proposed legislation that—if enacted—would make permanent the $7.5 million debt limit applicable to debtors under subchapter V of chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code that has enjoyed only temporary status under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”) for the

“Just enough” is an undeniable—if informal—legal precept.  The concept finds its way into canon from adequacy of pleading to application of equity.  See, e.g., K-Tech Telecommunications, Inc. v. Time Warner Cable, Inc., 714 F.3d 1277, 1284 (Fed. Cir. 2013) (A complaint “must give just enough factual detail to provide ‘fair notice of what

From December 17-19, 2014, THQ Inc. filed approximately 78 preference complaints seeking to avoid and recover alleged preferential transfers pursuant to Sections 547 and 550 of the Bankruptcy Code, and to disallow claims of the defendants pursuant to Section 502(d).

By way of background, THQ Inc. (the “Debtor”) filed a petition for bankruptcy in the